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    WEBINAR — Lessons from The Atlantic: Bridging the Curiosity Gap | Wednesday, February 11 2pm ET

    The Atlantic has been a long-admired and influential magazine, but with the advent of the internet and the arrival of social media, it has had to adapt. In doing so, it has thrived, and its website has become one of the most-visited sites on the web.

    Lessons from The Atlantic: Closing the Curiosity Gap is a Communications Network members-only webinar that will explore the data-based lessons learned by The Atlantic’s team, and their application to nonprofit communications professionals.

    The Atlantic learned that much of its online traffic was coming through the “side door.” that is, prompted by email or social media. In order to maximize a reader’s interest and prompt them to click on a link in an email or a tweet, they have mastered the art of “bridging the curiosity gap,” or turning interest into clicks — a skill everyone can use.

    This webinar will teach you how The Atlantic and its sister brands craft headlines that attract reader attention, without falling into the pitfalls of disappointing “click-bait.”

    DATE: Wednesday, February 11, 2015
    TIME: 2pm-3pm EST
    REGISTER HERE

    With today’s content traveling so prominently on social media and email, a robust headline strategy is critical to building curiosity and cultivating reader interest, whether you’re a magazine publisher or a social sector leader.

  • WEBINAR REPLAY: Big Ideas for Short Videos

    Foundations and their grantees are increasingly producing effective multimedia as audiences have become more sophisticated. And often, they are producing highly entertaining or emotionally impactful videos for relatively little money. For foundations and nonprofits, the question is no longer “Should we be producing multimedia?” but “How do we?” Human Rights Watch and the Ford Foundation, winners of Webby Awards and a Peabody Award, share tips including how to bring big ideas to short videos, how to tailor your message to diverse audiences, and why you shouldn’t work with creatives who only work with foundations.

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    WEBINAR: The PDF Is the Enemy (Replay)

    KEY TAKEAWAYS

    • PDFs present challenges like the inability to select text, formatting limitations, and the inability to export charts and tables.
    • To make PDFs more usable, provide download links to data, incorporate data portals, and create HTML/CSS tables that link back to original data.
    • Look to peers in the field to see examples of best practices and models for releasing data in a shareable way.

    Read More

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    In Case You Missed It: The PDF Is the Enemy WEBINAR

    If you were unable to attend the second installment of our Open Data for the Social Sector series, The PDF Is the Enemy (But It Doesn’t Have to Be), hosted by The Communications Network in partnership with Foundation Center and Sunlight Foundation, a replay of the webinar is forthcoming. Please check back on December 12, 2014.

    In the meantime, you can view the slides from the presentation below.


     


     

  • Pens Down, Paintbrushes Up

    Phillip Adams – Communication Matters Mural Timelapse from Cerrone Photography on Vimeo.

    Outside the large hall where the keynote speakers held court, muralist Phillip Adams was easy to spot, with his paint-spattered chinos and rumpled shirt. His clothes weren’t the only thing that set him apart from the assembled crowd; he was at Communications Network #ComNet14 to paint.

    “This felt like a good fit,” said Adams of his commission. He liked the connection to others engaged in social change.

    For the past decade, Adams has been creating public art through the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program. He has a studio practice, too, but relishes how the public art projects he works on take him more deeply into issues he cares about. He has worked with nursing home residents and with post-9/11 vets which, as a self-described army brat, was particularly meaningful for him. There have been many others.

    Adams finds inspiration from working in the public sphere, taking cues from the physical space where his works have been commissioned, and often engaging with community residents, or a specific population, on the creative process.

    He wanted that for this project, too, and invited conference-goers, in-between their sessions on metrics and measurement and media, to put down their pens (and cell phones and tablets) and put paint to canvas.

    “A couple of the first people who did it were so focused,” he said. “You could see they were really into a place of peace for those moments.”

    He started the first morning of the conference with three canvases, on which he had penciled in his basic design. A pastel wash gave the background a watercolor effect. At the center of the middle panel is a rock cairn, “which any regular hiker knows… can always help you find your way.”

    I think all of us know about looking for markers, signposts, and other guidance as we navigate through the complexities of our work. It’s what brought us to the conference in the first place, seeking the knowledge that we hope can enhance our efforts.

    Adams also hoped his mural would help conference goers “think about the beauty behind what they do—not just the cerebral part. I’m hoping to capture that.”

    The mural, commissioned with the generous support of Knight Arts, is now residing at the Russell Byers Charter School, where it will inspire students to create their own art.

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    Lauren Kay - Lauren photoLauren Kay is the director of communications for Community Partners, a nonprofit fiscal sponsor and philanthropic intermediary in Los Angeles. Follow her on Twitter at @CommunityPrtnrs.

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